Long road to a short answer

By , 19 January, 2011, 1 Comment

Once upon a time, when you read “Made in the USA” you knew what it meant.  You knew that somewhere in the United States, a company and it’s employees spent some time and effort creating the thing you were looking at.  It may have been a Matchbox car (Do they even make those anymore?) or a real car.  It may have cost a little or alot, but regardless of the price it was made in the US.  Somewhere along the line, other phrases started popping up: “Assembled in the US”, “Made in XYZ of US parts”, and “Designed in the US, built in XYZ”.

So I became curious about the labeling that I was seeing.  Of course, the go-to source for information on all things regulated is the US Government, specifically the Federal Trade Commissi0n.  Big mistake.  The FTC published a handy guide to marketing and advertising your products in the United States.  It contains 40 pages.  It talks about implied and implicit advertising, qualified and unqualified labeling, percentages of manufacturing, raw materials and how far from the source the final product is before it hits the market.

To be fair, I suppose all of those things are necessary to deal with the diverse situations that arise with imports and such.  But I was really just looking for a simple answer.  And I found it.

If you really want to know if a product is made in the USA, just hire someone local to build it for you!


1 Response {+}
  • Randy

    Hydrothunderr / hey man. ive been using this xyz too. but i was wondering what video captruing software you used. i wanted to contribute back to culino with a video in 4.1. great video by the way!

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